The modern British distant waters fishing fleet has a proud history, catching cod and haddock off Norway and Greenland for the nation's fish & chip shops

Cod and haddock are the UK’s nationwide favourite fish but our own waters don't have anything like enough of them to satisfy demand even for the fish & chips sold in our chippies. The most bountiful cod and haddock fisheries are in the northern distant waters such as the Barents Sea off northern Norway. British fishermen have been working there, some 1,500 miles from our own shores, for hundreds of years. If we lose our right to fish in these waters it would mean the loss of access to this natural asset; and it would mean even more of the fish for our national dish would have to be supplied by foreign boats or imported.

Fish & chips So what's the catch? Cod and haddock caught by Kirkella, Britain’s finest trawler
Come and celebrate Kirkella with us…
Kirkella is designed to go to far northern waters between Norway and Greenland to catch cod and haddock for the nation’s fish & chip shops…
Come and see Kirkella on the Thames at Greenwich and have FREE fish & chips (on a first come, first served basis)
12:30pm to 2:30pm Wednesday 24 April 2019
Cutty Sark Gardens, Greenwich SE10 9HT

Where does our cod and haddock come from?

The most abundant, plentiful stocks are found outside British waters in the icy waters of the far north Atlantic...

Just what makes Kirkella the pride of Britain’s distant waters trawler fleet?

She’s our new 81m state-of-the-art freezer trawler with 30 crew on board...

Cod and haddock are demersal fish

Find out more about pelagic, demersal and shellfish...

If we’re not careful we could lose the right to catch British fish for our chippies

The future of UK distant waters fishing depends on maintaining our historic quotas through fair deals struck with other countries, especially Norway, so that we can continue to fish for cod and haddock off their coasts.

Find out all about Great British Fish